Thursday, February 18, 2010

Postcard Friendship Friday - Valentine Publishing



Valentine and Sons of Dundee were once Scotland’s most successful commercial photographers. In 1907, at the height of the postcard revolution, the photographs they published showed scenes from around the world. Often regarded as only postcard publishers, Valentines produced images in various formats including fine early photographic prints.

The Valentine company was founded in Dundee by James’s father, John Valentine, in 1825. After learning the daguerreotype process in Paris in the late 1840s, James added portrait photography to the family business in 1851. By the 1860s the company had begun to cater to the growing tourist industry by producing photographic prints with views from around the country. After James’s death in 1880, his son William Dobson took over the ever-expanding business.

At Valentine’s the greeting card gradually replaced the picture postcard. What remained of a card making empire was sold to Hallmark Cards Inc. in 1980. ~ From the Toronto Postcard Club

Valentine Publishing Co., PTY., Ltd.   1923-1963 
Melbourne and Sydney, Australia  
While Valentine’s closed most of its overseas branches in 1923, this company continued to publish and distribute their postcards in addition to playing cards and tourist guides. Their cards were printed in Great Britain in lithographic halftones but they bare little resemblance to the traditional Valentine card. These cards were not numbered. In addition they published real photo cards with many of them issued in large sets. They also accepted contracts for cards from many other Australian publishers.  An earlier set of view-cards depicting Australian scenes can be found under the name of Valentine & Sons Publishing Company of Melbourne. These cards were also printed in Great Britain in halftone lithography but they more closely resemble those marketed back in England. These cards are numbered and carry a V.G. prefix.  ~ From the Metropolitan Postcard Club of New York

Today St Kilda has been absorbed by the metropolis and the road survives as one of the city's major arteries, flanked by a mix of office, residential and mixed use towers. The street is known for its width and leafiness. For most of its length, the wide street consists of a wide shared footpath, street side parking, a bicycle lane, two lanes for motor vehicle traffic, median strip reserve, another two lanes for motor vehicle traffic and a tram line on either side.

The train station is in use today.

The library is in use today with several renovations.

The Old Treasury Building on Spring Street in Melbourne, was once home to the Treasury Department of the Government of Victoria, but is now a museum of Melbourne history, known as the City Museum.  
Check out other participants of Postcard Friendship Friday

12 comments:

Bob of Holland said...

An original post. I did not know Valentine publishers, but I do know Melbourne and I love the city. I've visited its old station and also the heritage cafe at the other side of the street, and the wonderful theatres, some of them former movie palaces, the new museum, the... I can go on and on (and I don't even work for the city government's pr department). Thanks. Happy PFF.

Postcardy said...

Interesting history.

Snap said...

Wonderful educational post. Thanks and Happy PFF!

Chris Overstreet said...

I'm sure I have a few of these Valentines myself; must track them down.

Mary said...

Really enjoyed the information, as I'm a casual postcard collector and had no idea there was so much information available about printers and different eras of postcards, etc. Thanks!

Sheila said...

I have several Valentine's postcards, enough that I hadn't focused on how long ago it was that they stopped publishing. A very interesting post.

Aimee said...

Very Interesting! Beautiful cards of Melbourne!

Dayhomemama said...

Thank you for sharing that awesome little bit of history!

Max said...

Great Information!

Irene said...

thanks for a great post, I must check my postcards more carefully, there seems to be more information than I ever can find. Thanks.

Patricia's Paper Crafts said...

What great information on the postcards thanks.

Stacey said...

Happy (week late) Pff! Nice little history tidbit!